Terça-feira, 30 de Junho de 2009

Look to Portugal!

Fui ler, na íntegra, o artigo original de Don Tapscott, sobre o exemplo de Portugal para solucionar o problema da Educação nos Estados Unidos. Isto já passou, mas, confesso que o aparecimento de escritos desta natureza me fascina. Fascina-me porque é um daqueles casos em que há um problema de dimensão mais que muita, de resolução mais que difícil e nada óbvia, ou, provavelmente, sem resolução e apenas hipóteses de redução da sua dimensão, dando azo a que se aventuram alguns “especialistas” com propostas inovadoras e fantásticas. Fascina-me porque as propostas que aparecem são sempre feitas por quem não conhece o terreno e a realidade. Fascina-me porque, em regra geral, as propostas que aparecem só aumentarão a dimensão do problema!

 
Quanto ao artigo de Don Tapscott, fascinou-me, também, a sua incapacidade para averiguar as informações dadas por fontes governamentais. É como um jornalista visitar a URSS em tempo de Guerra Fria e vir de lá espalhar ao mundo que está tudo bem e que é o máximo viver-se naquele paraíso, porque assim lhe disseram as fontes governamentais…
 
Note to President Obama: Want to Fix the Schools? Look to Portugal!
 
President Obama already knows that the nation's schools are failing a large number of young Americans. One-third of all students drop out before finishing high school. It's a terrible record, and it's even worse in inner city public schools, where only half of blacks and Hispanics graduate from school. This is not a legacy that would make anyone proud: More young Americans on a proportionate basis drop out of school today than at any other time in our history.
 
This problem is undoubtedly complicated, but one of the reasons why many American youth are unmotivated and not learning well is that they're bored in school. They're grown up in a fast paced, challenging digital world, with the Internet, mobile devices, video games and other gadgets. They watch less television than their parents did and TV is typically a background activity. They are a generation doesn't like to be broadcast to and they love to interact, multi-task and collaborate. Yet, when they get into the classroom, they're faced with stale textbooks and lectures from teachers who are still using a nineteenth century innovation, chalk and blackboard.
 
American classrooms need to enter the 21st century. Thousands of teachers agree. Earlier this year, several important educational groups urged the president and Congress to spend nearly $10 billion to improve technology in the classroom, and ensure teachers know how to use computers most effectively.
 
To show the way, I suggest the president take a look at a modest country across the Atlantic that's turning into the world leader in rethinking education for the 21st century.
 
That country is Portugal. Its economy in early 2005 was sagging, and it was running out of the usual economic fixes. It also scored some of the lowest educational achievement results in western Europe.
 
So Prime Minister Jose Socrates took a courageous step. He decided to invest heavily in a "technological shock" to jolt his country into the 21st century. This meant, among other things, that he'd make sure everyone in the workforce could handle a computer and use the Internet effectively.
 
This could transform Portuguese society by giving people immediate access to world. It would open up huge opportunities that could make Portugal a richer and more competitive place. But it wouldn't happen unless people had a computer in their hands.
 
In 2005, only 31% of the Portuguese households had access to the Internet. To improve this penetration, the logical place to start was in school, where there was only one computer for five kids. The aim was to have one computer for every two students by 2010.
 
So Portugal launched the biggest program in the world to equip every child in the country with a laptop and access to the web and the world of collaborative learning. To pay for it, Portugal tapped into both government funds and money from mobile operators who were granted 3G licenses. That subsidized the sale of one million ultra-cheap laptops to teachers, school children, and adult learners.
 
Here's how it works: If you're a teacher or a student, you can buy a laptop for 150 euros (U.S. $207). You also get a discounted rate for broadband Internet access, wired or wireless. Low income students get an even bigger discount, and connected laptops are free or virtually free for the poorest kids. For the youngest students in Grades 1 to 4, the laptop/Internet access deal is even cheaper -- 50 euros for those who can pay; free for those who can't.
 
That's only the start: Portugal has invested 400 million euros to makes sure each classroom has access to the Internet. Just about every classroom in the public system now has an interactive smart board, instead of the old fashioned blackboard.
 
This means that nearly nine out of 10 students in Grades 1 to 4 have a laptop on their desk. The impact on the classroom is tremendous, as I saw this spring when I toured a classroom of seven-year-olds in a public school in Lisbon. It was the most exciting, noisy, collaborative classroom I have seen in the world.
 
The teacher directed the kids to an astronomy blog with a beautiful color image of a rotating solar system on the screen. "Now," said the teacher, "Who knows what the equinox is?"
 
Nobody knew.
 
"Alright, why don't you find out?"
 
The chattering began, as the children clustered together to figure out what an equinox was. Then one group lept up and waved their hands. They found it! They then proceeded to explain the idea to their classmates.
 
This, I thought, was the exact opposite of everything that is wrong with the classroom system in the United States.
 
The children in this Portuguese classroom were loving learning about astronomy. They were collaborating. They were working at their own pace. They barely noticed the technology, the much-vaunted laptop. It was like air to them. But it changed the relationship they had with their teacher. Instead of fidgeting in their chairs while the teacher lectures and scrawls some notes on the blackboard, they were the explorers, the discoverers, and the teacher was their helpful guide.
 
Yet too often, in the U.S. school system, teachers still rely on an Industrial Model of education. They deliver a lecture, the same one to all students. It's a one-way lecture. The teacher is the expert; the students are expected to absorb what the teacher says and repeat. And students are supposed to learn alone.
 
Teachers often feel that this is the only way to teach a large classroom of kids, and yet the classroom in Portugal shows that giving kids laptops can free the teacher to introduce a new way of learning that's more natural for kids who have grown up digital at home.
 
First, it allows teachers to step off the stage and start listening and conversing instead of just lecturing. Second, the teacher can encourage students to discover for themselves, and learn a process of discovery and critical thinking instead of just memorizing the teacher's information. Third, the teacher can encourage students to collaborate among themselves and with others outside the school. Finally, the teacher can tailor the style of education to their students' individual learning styles.
 
It's not easy to change the model of teaching. In fact, this is the hard part. It's far easier to spend money, as Portugal did, to put Internet into the classroom and equip the kids with laptops. ( By now, half of high school students now have them, as do four in 10 middle school students.)
 
Yet Portugal has been careful to invest in teacher training to capitalize on the possibilities of the laptops in schools. They're also thinking of creating a new online platform to allow teachers to work together to create new lessons and course materials that take advantage of the interactive technology. Through this collaboration, the Portuguese school system will create exciting new online materials to educate children. Lots of ideas are already making their way into Portuguese classrooms, says Mario Franco, chair of the Foundation for Mobile Communication, which is managing the e-school program. There are 50 different educational programs and games inside the laptops the youngest children use. The laptops are even equipped with a control to encourage kids to finish their homework and score high marks. If they do, they get more time to play.
 
It's too early to assess the impact on learning in Portuguese schools. Studies of the impact of computers in schools elsewhere have been inconclusive, or mixed. One key problem is that simply providing computers in schools is not enough. Teachers facing a classroom of kids with laptops need to learn that they are no longer the expert in their domain; the Internet is.
 
Yet Portugal is on a campaign to reinvent learning for the 21st century. The technology is only one part of that campaign. The real work is creating a new model of learning.
 
I believe this could help the U.S. revive students' interest in school and perhaps keep them in school long enough to graduate, and even go to college. It would be a substantial investment. It's estimated that the total cost of giving a computer to each student, including connection to networks, training, and maintenance, is over $1,000 per year.
 
Yet after seeing the promise of the exciting classrooms in Portugal, I'm convinced it is worth it. Your child should be so fortunate.
 
Don Tapscott
 
Só me apetece bater-lhe com a cabeça na parede… mas não posso…
 
1. “So Portugal launched the biggest program in the world to equip every child in the country with a laptop and access to the web and the world of collaborative learning.” – Isso é que era bom! Acesso à Internet, sim, mas, collaborative learning? Aposto como Don Tapscott não faz ideia do que é uma criança…
 
2. “Here's how it works: If you're a teacher or a student, you can buy a laptop for 150 euros (U.S. $207).” – Ah, sim? Ia jurar que nenhum professor comprou um computador portátil por 150 euros. Fica bem dizer que sim, mas não é bem assim. Mas, o que interessa, é que Sócrates conseguiu fazer passar a mensagem de que foram só 150 euros.
 
3. “Just about every classroom in the public system now has an interactive smart board, instead of the old fashioned blackboard.” – Informações de fontes governamentais, portanto. Na minha escola, nem um terço das salas tem quadros interactivos.
 
4. “The impact on the classroom is tremendous, as I saw this spring when I toured a classroom of seven-year-olds in a public school in Lisbon. It was the most exciting, noisy, collaborative classroom I have seen in the world.” – Qual impacto? Impacto tremendo é nos intervalos, com os miúdos a jogarem Counter Strike em rede, uns contra os outros. Impacto tremendo é em casa, para os pais os fazerem largar os jogos e irem para a cama. E se o senhor Don quiser ver uma sala de aula excitante, barulhenta e colaborativa, pode vir à minha escola, que a malta monta-lhe lá um circo de tal maneira, com tanta tecnologia de ponta, tanta Internet, tantos computadores, que seremos projectados para as galáxias mais longínquas; mas só uma sala, está bem?
 
5. “(…) the classroom in Portugal shows that giving kids laptops can free the teacher to introduce a new way of learning that's more natural for kids who have grown up digital at home.” – Dar computadores aos alunos pode não libertar o professor; pode, sim, arranjar-lhe uma dor de cabeça de todo o tamanho, sempre a correr de um lado para o outro para evitar que eles entrem em sites que não devem, que se metam a jogar, etc. Os alunos que cresceram com um mundo digital, cresceram a divertir-se, a jogar, a sacar músicas, a teclar no Messenger, a criar a sua página no hi5… não foi a aprender matérias que não lhes trazem prazer imediato!
 
6. “Yet Portugal has been careful to invest in teacher training to capitalize on the possibilities of the laptops in schools.” – Formação de professores para trabalhar com computadores? Ah, claro, aquela sessão do pessoal a cantar e a remar à custa do Magalhães. Esta era mais fácil: bastava-lhe entrevistar meia dúzia de professores. Se calhar dava muito trabalho.
 
7. “The laptops are even equipped with a control to encourage kids to finish their homework and score high marks. If they do, they get more time to play.” – Que anedota! Faz-me lembrar aqueles pais que se babam de orgulho porque os seus petizes ficam a “estudar na Internet” até às cinco da madrugada…
 
8. “One key problem is that simply providing computers in schools is not enough.” – Pois não. Mas se fizermos propaganda de que a formação necessária foi feita, mesmo que não tenha sido feita, fica o problema resolvido.
 
9. “The real work is creating a new model of learning.” – Não querendo ser desmancha-prazeres, não há nenhum modelo de aprendizagem em curso. Bom, há uma coisa chamada Novas Oportunidades, mas isso é outra conversa. Ao fim de tantos séculos, alguns intelectuais chegaram à conclusão que o que se andou a fazer durante tanto tempo, e que gerou o mundo que temos, com a tecnologia que temos, está ultrapassado. Em Educação, creio que o maior erro que se pode cometer é achar-se que se errou. Seja na escola ou em casa. Porque, daí para a frente, as “soluções” são quase sempre desastrosas.
publicado por pedro-na-escola às 18:10
link do post | comentar | favorito
Sexta-feira, 26 de Junho de 2009

Erro de simpatia

Um dia destes, cruzei-me com um termo que desconhecia por completo: “erro de simpatia”. Ainda não consegui encontrar uma definição para este termo simpático que parece ser usado para justificar certos lapsos de escrita. Mas, ao mesmo tempo que me cruzei com o termo, cruzei-me também com um exemplo.
 
Exemplo de erro de simpatia: 50/100=2. Desculpável e, portanto, não penalizável.
 
Se tivermos 100/50=3, isto será um erro de cálculo elementar, obviamente penalizável.
 
Há dias em que só me apetece suspirar de desalento…
publicado por pedro-na-escola às 20:07
link do post | comentar | favorito
Quinta-feira, 25 de Junho de 2009

Líder mundial a repensar a educação… ou não…

 

Especialista considera Portugal "líder mundial a repensar a educação"
25.06.2009 - 07h39 Lusa – in www.publico.pt
 
O especialista canadiano em tecnologia Don Tapscott aponta Portugal como um exemplo a seguir na educação, elogiando o investimento em computadores individuais nas salas de aulas. Num artigo de opinião publicado no blogue Huffington Post - onde já escreveu Barack Obama -, Tapscott dirige-se directamente ao presidente dos Estados Unidos da América: "Quer resolver os problemas das escolas? Olhe para Portugal!".
 
Na opinião de Tapscott, o "modesto país para lá do Atlântico", que em 2005 via a sua economia "abater-se", está a tornar-se no "líder mundial a repensar a educação para o século XXI". A presença de computadores nas escolas é "só uma parte" dessa "campanha de reinvenção", frisa Tapscott, que aponta a "criação de um novo modelo de ensino" como a "maior tarefa".
 
"Não é fácil mudar o modelo de ensino. Aliás, essa é a parte difícil. É mais fácil gastar dinheiro, como Portugal fez, a pôr Internet nas salas de aula e equipar os alunos com computadores", afirmou, acrescentando ainda que "é demasiado cedo para avaliar o impacto na aprendizagem", até porque os estudos sobre a presença de computadores nas aulas foram "inconclusivos".
 
"Os professores que enfrentam uma sala de aulas cheia de miúdos com computadores precisam de aprender que já não são os especialistas no seu domínio: a Internet é que é", escreve Tapscott. Aludindo à sua experiência numa sala de aulas numa estadia em Portugal, Tapscott conta como os alunos recorreram à Internet para resolver uma questão colocada pelo professor: para saber o que era um equinócio, grupos de alunos pesquisaram a informação e quem a descobriu primeiro explicou-a aos colegas".
 
Mudança na relação professor/aluno
 
"Estavam a colaborar, estavam a trabalhar ao seu próprio ritmo e mal reparavam na tecnologia, no propalado computador portátil. Era como ar para eles, mas mudou a relação que tinham com o professor. Em vez de se agitarem nas cadeiras enquanto o professor dá a lição e escreve apontamentos no quadro, eram eles os exploradores, os descobridores e o professor o seu guia", descreve Don Tapscott.
 
Este modelo, afirma, permite aos professores "descer do palco e começar a ouvir e a conversar em vez de fazer sermões" e encoraja o pensamento crítico e a colaboração. Em oposição, nos EUA, a aprendizagem é "unidireccional", o que faz com que os alunos, que em casa vivem na era digital, com a Internet, os jogos e os telemóveis, estejam "aborrecidos na escola".
 
"As salas de aula americanas precisam de entrar no século XXI. Milhares de professores concordam com isto", afirma Don Tapscott, lembrando que este ano "importantes grupos da área da Educação" pediram a Barack Obama e ao congresso um investimento de 10 mil milhões de dólares para melhorar a tecnologia na sala de aula e garantir que os professores sabem usar computadores eficientemente".
 
Don Tapscott, professor na Universidade de Toronto e membro do grupo de reflexão nGenera Insight, escreveu vários livros sobre tecnologia e visitou Portugal em Abril deste ano. O Huffington Post congrega blogues, notícias e artigos de opinião. Além de políticos, actores e académicos contribuem para o site.
 
Esta peça jornalística, datada de 25 de Junho de 2009, é de uma patetice infeliz. Ou, melhor: os comentários do senhor Don Tapscott são completamente patéticos e, cá para mim, só lhe atestam uma incapacidade infantil para analisar o que quer que seja. Basta ler um pouco do que ele escreveu, no original:
 
“So Prime Minister Jose Socrates took a courageous step. He decided to invest heavily in a "technological shock" to jolt his country into the 21st century. This meant, among other things, that he'd make sure everyone in the workforce could handle a computer and use the Internet effectively.”
 
Lá está, a mensagem genial de Sócrates, ao bom estilo do salvador da pátria portuguesa. A patetice da questão é que, de facto, na realidade, Sócrates limitou-se a “investir” à toa no seu choque tecnológico. O pretenso salto para o século XXI faz parte da sua mensagem de propaganda, mas não é um facto. Don Tapscott, com a mesma credulidade, ou ingenuidade, de um qualquer iletrado do Portugal profundo, acreditou piamente que Sócrates garantiu mesmo que todos os cidadãos activos saberiam trabalhar com um computador e usar a Internet. Alguém que acredita num disparate destes, sujeita-se a não ter muita credibilidade, digo eu.
 
Sobre a peça jornalística, saltam-me para a vista, como ciscos, algumas coisas:
 
1. “(Os professores) precisam de aprender que já não são os especialistas no seu domínio: a Internet é que é!”. Ora bem, eu, professor de Matemática, já não sou um especialista em Matemática. A Internet é que é a especialista. Claro. Como é sabido, a Internet caiu do céu num dia de sol, já com conteúdos prontos a consumir.
 
2. “(…) experiência numa sala de aulas numa estadia em Portugal (…)”. Dito assim, parece que o senhor andou numa de “um-dó-li-tá” até lhe sair na rifa uma das mais de 1200 escolas portuguesas, quiçá do interior do país, onde, espantosamente, o desenrolar dos acontecimentos numa sala aleatória dessa escola cumpria idealmente com a metodologia de utilização dos computadores em contexto de aula. Que pontaria!
 
3. “(…) eram eles os exploradores, os descobridores e o professor o seu guia (…)”. Que bonito que parece, quando se passa esta ideia. Isto é válido para uma determinada percentagem da população discente, que tem sede de aprender o que a escola tem para ensinar, ou, no pior caso, que tem pais em casa que exigem determinantemente que aprendam. Quanto aos restantes, em percentagem ainda por determinar mas certamente escandalosa, a exploração e os descobrimentos aplicam-se ao que os discentes desejam aprender e não ao que a escola tem para ensinar, sendo certo que uma coisa não tem nada que ver com a outra – exceptuando quem vive no mundo da Lua e pensa que a grande maioria da população discente portuguesa estará desejosa de aprender português, inglês, francês, matemática, ciências, história, geografia, etc., só porque agora o pode fazer com recurso à Internet.
 
4. “(…) o que faz com que os alunos, que em casa vivem na era digital, com a Internet, os jogos e os telemóveis, estejam "aborrecidos na escola" (…)”. Sempre houve, e haverá, alunos aborrecidos na escola. Faz parte da natureza humana. Especialmente quando em casa têm acesso ilimitado ao divertidíssimo mundo da Internet, para consulta de sites, visualização de vídeos, chats, redes sociais, jogos, etc., e o telemóvel, que é mais vulgar que um relógio de pulso, lhes permite contactar com os colegas, tirar fotografias, ouvir música, jogar, etc. A era digital é tão atraente por causa da diversão que proporciona! Nós, adultos, é que podemos ver a era digital como uma oportunidade de usar ferramentas poderosas para fins profissionais ou de aprendizagem. Mas, as crianças e jovens não pensam como os adultos. Mal seria se o fizessem.
 
5. “As salas de aula americanas precisam de entrar no século XXI. Milhares de professores concordam com isto (…)”. Entrar no século XXI significa não renunciar às ferramentas disponíveis. Significa não ficar agarrado aos quadros de ardósia, quando há quadros brancos e quadros interactivos. Significa não ficar agarrado apenas aos livros, quando há também a Internet. Um quadro de ardósia e um livro, são tão eficientes no ensino, hoje, como o eram no século passado. Não devemos é ficar colados ao século passado, ignorando o que este século nos coloca à disposição.
 
6. (…) garantir que os professores sabem usar computadores eficientemente”. Alguns americanos andam a chagar a cabeça ao Obama para investir em tecnologia nas Educação, mas, note-se, com a condição implícita da formação adequada dos professores para potenciar esse investimento. Qualquer semelhança com o investimento nos Magalhães, em Portugal, é puro disparate. Digo-o com conhecimento de causa, depois de participar na lendária formação de dar ao remo e cantar.
publicado por pedro-na-escola às 19:20
link do post | comentar | ver comentários (2) | favorito
Quarta-feira, 24 de Junho de 2009

Brincar aos números

Hoje, na minha escola, os professores de Matemática entretiveram-se a dar mais umas pinceladas na candidatura ao Plano da Matemática II. Nestes momentos de trabalho, surgem algumas jornadas de reflexão profunda sobre o “estado da educação” e a moda dos “números”.
 
Há uma paranóia recente com as metas, na Educação. Falando sem conhecimento de causa, eu diria que é mais um capricho de meia dúzia de pseudo-especialistas, que acham que o problema da Educação em Portugal se resolve com a adopção de metas quantitativas em relação aos resultados dos alunos. No Plano da Matemática (no original e no II) exigem-nos o estabelecimento de metas para a evolução dos alunos. No modelo-faz-de-conta de avaliação do desempenho dos docentes, em versão original, também.
 
Ora, na minha opinião, que não passa disso mesmo, estabelecer metas para os resultados dos alunos é um profundo disparate e carece de lógica. Fica bem, para “inglês ver”, mas é uma palermice. Aceitar pacificamente metas destas é aceitar que podemos facilmente controlar os resultados das aprendizagens dos nossos alunos, como se o processo ensino-aprendizagem dependesse única e exclusivamente de nós, professores. Há muita gente que acha que sim, não lhes cabendo na cabecinha a existência de um jovem que não quer aprender absolutamente nada. A realidade é que os resultados escolares dependem de vários factores, sendo que o desempenho do professor é um deles, com um peso que é directamente proporcional à autoridade e expectativas dos pais.
 
Assim, numa escola como a minha, onde há cada vez menos pais a terem uma autoridade real sobre os filhos e onde as expectativas de futuro desses pais não vão além de um 9º ano às-três-pancadas, embora o 4º ano chegasse, não há qualquer lógica no estabelecimento de metas para resultados escolares. Em cada ano de escolaridade, os resultados dependem, basicamente, do número de pais que exigem aos seus filhos resultados positivos. E isso varia de ano para ano.
 
Mas, ainda temos uma agravante. Na nossa escola, num meio rural, o número de turmas por ano de escolaridade varia entre um e três. Percentualmente, um aluno dos nossos alunos representa um valor substancialmente maior que outro aluno numa escola de cidade, onde pode haver dez turmas por ano. Este facto faz com que as previsões estatísticas tenham ainda menos lógica. Mas, presumo eu, o que interessa é mesmo os números, não a lógica.
 
Por falar em números, o Plano da Matemática é um voraz consumidor de euros, na ordem dos milhões. Comprámos muito material para a Matemática, é certo, mas, sinceramente, esse acréscimo de material não se traduz directamente em sucesso. Dá jeito, sim. Mas, convém não esquecer que a Matemática exige atenção nas aulas, trabalho nas aulas e trabalho em casa. Por mais materiais que se adquiram, por maior que seja o circo que montemos para motivar os miúdos, sem atenção e sem trabalho não há aprendizagens.
 
No final, claro, fica bem aparecer na comunicação social para dizer que se investiram X milhões com a Matemática. Lá está: à boa maneira de Sócrates, o importante é mostrar que se fez qualquer coisa e chapar números e euros aos milhões, mesmo que não se tenha feito nada de consequente, que os números sejam apenas para encher o olho ao povo distraído e que os euros não sejam mais do que um esbanjamento irresponsável dos dinheiros públicos.
publicado por pedro-na-escola às 23:05
link do post | comentar | favorito
Terça-feira, 23 de Junho de 2009

A Matemática, os exames e outras coisas

Já passou o “stress” da preparação dos meus alunos para o exame nacional do 9º ano. Entre os brilhantes comentários da Sociedade Portuguesa de Matemática e da Associação de Professores de Matemática, os textos e comentários nos blogs, e as perguntas dos meus colegas sobre o grau de dificuldade do exame, apetece-me divagar um bocadinho:
 
1. Cada vez mais, acho que seria extraordinariamente divertido haver exames nacionais às demais disciplinas do 3º ciclo. Não desejo mal a ninguém, mas há dias em que cansa ver a Língua Portuguesa e a Matemática a serem as únicas disciplinas a levar com as luzes da ribalta.
 
2. Não é só uma questão de atenções para estas duas disciplinas. Há, na realidade, um acréscimo de trabalho para quem as lecciona: pela preparação para os exames nacionais, que abrangem três anos de escolaridade, e pela posterior correcção de algumas dezenas de exames, a quem calhar essa tarefa. Um acréscimo de trabalho que, por ausência de compensação monetária ou outra, a bem dizer, espelha alguma injustiça.
 
3. Aliás, era bom que, de uma vez por todas, se esclarecesse, de forma objectiva, que não há um “problema” chamado Matemática. Esta disciplina serve, tão só e apenas, de bode expiatório para um mal mais geral.
 
4. Tenho alguma esperança de que, neste ano lectivo, a minha pequena escola não figure, novamente, nos últimos 50 lugares do ranking nacional. A dezena de alunos que este ano frequentou um CEF, o primeiro a funcionar na nossa escola, representa, na prática e sem rodeios, menos dez negativas no exame nacional de Matemática do 9º ano.
 
5. Sobre o grau de dificuldade do exame nacional de Matemática do 9º ano, deste ano de 2009, há várias perspectivas. De um modo geral, e na minha perspectiva de professor de Matemática, acho que o exame era muito fácil. Na perspectiva dos conteúdos, apelava, de facto, a um domínio muito básico da matéria, de qualquer um dos anos do 3º ciclo. A interpretação continua a ser um obstáculo omnipresente, se bem que o termo “interpretação” pode, contrariando os “especialistas” em educação, ser facilmente confundido com falta de brio, falta de persistência, preguiça mental, ou desleixo. Os meus alunos “queixaram-se” que foi muito fácil, mas já descobriram algumas asneiras patéticas e evitáveis.
 
6. Ora, esta hipotética “facilidade”, confrontada com os erros cometidos pelos alunos neste exame e com os resultados que serão públicos daqui a umas poucas semanas, leva-me à minha já antiga convicção de que temos um problema sério com os programas das nossas disciplinas. Como é que os alunos, durante o ano, resolvem problemas com complexidade e dificuldade muito superior aos do exame, nas fichas de avaliação ou de trabalho, e, depois, espalham-se ao comprido no exame?
 
7. Desta falha, que se evidencia num exame perante uma questão cuja dificuldade é diminuta, faço uma leitura simples: há uma fraqueza na aplicação do conhecimento a situações diversas.
 
8. Esta fragilidade da aplicação do conhecimento é um sintoma que resulta – na minha humilde opinião – do exagero de conteúdos que marca a generalidade das disciplinas do sistema de ensino em Portugal. Começando pela Matemática. Falo por mim, correndo o risco de contra mim falar: a preocupação com o cumprimento do programa está sempre acima da preocupação com a assimilação e o domínio dos conteúdos por parte dos alunos.
 
9. Aliás, isto entra em sintonia com a ideia que vigora no país: a quantidade é sempre melhor, mais importante e mais vistoso, do que a qualidade.
 
10. Porque, falando pela parte que me toca, passei o ano lectivo em contra-relógio. Programa do 9º ano para cumprir, preparação dos alunos para dois testes intermédios e um exame nacional, revisão dos conteúdos de três anos de escolaridade, fichas de avaliação, fichas de trabalho e fichas de preparação para o exame. Esta sensação de ter passado o ano a correr, pode significar que sou mau professor. Quiçá. Gostava de saber se sim, ou se não. Mas, na prática, no trabalho desenvolvido com os meus alunos, significa que não houve a serenidade que desejaria para explorar a aplicação dos conhecimentos que lhes transmiti ao longo do ano e, já agora, ao longo dos três anos em que fui professor deles.
tags:
publicado por pedro-na-escola às 23:15
link do post | comentar | favorito

~posts recentes

~ E a Terra é plana…

~ A propósito dos melhores…

~ A propósito de oportunida...

~ A propósito das paranóias...

~ Especialistas em educação

~ O que vai ficar por fazer

~ Nuno Crato e a definição ...

~ Mega-Agrupamentos 4 - a p...

~ Mega-Agrupamentos 3

~ Mega-Agrupamentos 2

~ Mega-Agrupamentos

~ O segredo do sucesso nas ...

~ A anedota da vaca

~ Por falar em reduzir as d...

~ Agressividade de autores ...

~ Brincando às competências...

~ Pois, realmente, não foi ...

~ Contas ao número de aluno...

~ Reforço da autoridade dos...

~ Incompetência ao rubro...

~links

~arquivos

~ Julho 2011

~ Junho 2011

~ Maio 2010

~ Abril 2010

~ Março 2010

~ Novembro 2009

~ Outubro 2009

~ Setembro 2009

~ Agosto 2009

~ Julho 2009

~ Junho 2009

~ Maio 2009

~ Abril 2009

~ Fevereiro 2009

~ Janeiro 2009

~ Dezembro 2008

~ Novembro 2008

~ Outubro 2008

~ Abril 2008

~ Março 2008

~ Fevereiro 2008

~ Janeiro 2008

~chafurdar no blog

 
RSS